Spinning an LP to Pieces at 12,500fps

Gav and Dan (aka The SloMo Guys) take 1 piece of vinyl and spin it so fast it becomes about 50,000 pieces of vinyl. The results are obviously captured by a very high speed camera.

We can’t show you how to spin quite that fast(!!), but watch as instructor DJ Rugged One shows off the baby scratch.

MMMMaven Record Fair

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Join our co-founder David Day and one of #MakeItNew‘s original resident DJ Baltimoroder as they pull some CHOICE cuts from their large stacks of wax. Minimal techno, micro-house, dub techno, dub reggae, classic house: Choice cuts. Labels will include Playhouse, Perlon, Kompakt, Soul Jazz, and much, much, more.

Joining them will be two local legends. One needs no introduction: DJ Kon is probably the best DJ in Boston. Kon will bring some of his lowest-hanging fruit which, to the traditional DJ, is peak-season harvest.

K.C. Hallett will bring some of his own, and needless to say, extensive, collection. You might know him from his years of the pioneering Soul Revival party in Boston’s South End. Or from his opening for Questlove, DJ Spinna, Kid Koala, Slum Village… Etc.

Also, this Friday you can pop into our Ableton lab where this semester’s Ableton intern Katherine can walk you through some Ableton production sessions.

ADMISSION IS FREE, BUT RSVP TO SAVE YOUR SPOT

10 Reasons Why You Should Still Know How to Beatmatch By Ear

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Here inside our DJ lab, we teach on vinyl and turntables for a reason. Not only is it to establish tradition or teach people how to scratch (still an amazing skill!).

Most importantly, it’s to get our graduated DJs used to mixing by ear, which really officially makes you a proper “DJ.”

PassionateDJ.com knows of what we speak. In their post, they name 10 distinct reasons you should know how to beatmatch by ear. For example, #4:

It allows you to mix to, from, or with other DJs.

If you are reliant on one particular setup and the ability to sync your tracks, you might as well throw out the idea of an impromptu tag-team set with a fellow DJ. While it’s true that there are ways to electronically sync multiple DJ setups, it adds unnecessary complication, doesn’t always work, and doesn’t allow for you to play alongside a vinyl DJ. It’s much easier (and more fun) to be able to just mix back and forth and not worry about what media formats are being used.

Here’s our instructor DJ Rugged One with a quick tutorial:

Click on through to see the rest of these thoughtful concepts plus more (like a scene from the Karate Kid)!

Our January classes are filling up now. Drop me a line and let’s get started on turning your DJ dreams into reality. Email me here.

Fundamental Scratch Techniques [11/13]

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Simply put, scratching is the art of manipulating the playback of a record. It first began in the mid 1970’s and has become a huge part of hip-hop, as well as other genre’s of music.

The turntable was not invented as an instrument, people made it into one.

Instructor Schuyler Stevens will teach students fundamental scratch techniques to build a foundation for improvising, creating, and performing a scratch routine. These scratch techniques include:

Open fader: Baby scratch, drag, scribble
Closed fader: Stab, chirp

Schuyler Stevens started out in Burlington Vermont learning how to DJ and make music when he was 15. He got his own pair of turntables and inherited a small portion of his parents record collection and was off at light speed, challenging himself and pushing his own limits ever since. Schuyler moved to Boston and attended The New England Institute of Art when he was 18 to continue his pursuit for more knowledge. Since going to school, Stevens has been gigging as a DJ/turntablist in the local Boston scene as well as in Brooklyn, NY. He has also been tracking and producing songs for multiple MCs around Boston. His music draws inspiration from old records, and mixes sounds of vintage samples with modern day synthesis, recording, and processing techniques.

Schuyler believes that you can never stop learning, there will always be somebody who can show you something you never thought was possible, and in turn inspire you to push your own boundaries beyond what you imagined you could do.

It is an ongoing loop perpetuated by people of like minds all striving for the same musical bliss, but in their own unique ways. In the world of music, anything and everything is possible.

RSVP to reserve your spot and your free gift bag: