Donna Summer Roller Disco Party Ends Up A Smash Hit for Boston

Photo by Greg Cook

Right as the summer solstice was just around the corner to sprinkle us with joy & happiness, so was Boston Mayor Martin J. Walsh.  On June 19th, the city of Boston in collaboration with Together Boston, held the 2nd annual “Celebration of Summer” event in Boston. Hundreds of citizens came together for a night of roller-skating, funk music, and friendly smiles from ear to ear in celebration of the amazing Donna Summer.

Donna Summer was a Boston native that later went on to become a legend in the music industry. She was the first artist to ever have three consecutive albums reach No. 1 on Billboards charts. She has also sold over 140 million records worldwide.

The event was held at the City Hall Plaza. People could bring their own skates or they could rent some at a near-by tent. The DJ’s of the night who kept the swell, joyful overtones were none other than Boston’s own Bosq and Caserta.

Photo by Greg Cook

Thanks to Perry Eaton at Boston.com, Get Ready for Another Donna Summer Roller Disco was published.

We thought the full interviews were too good to leave on the editing floor, however. They’re a great insight into the minds of these two beloved local DJs.

First up: BOSQ

It’s not about getting the olympics or getting google to build offices, it’s about events like this that bring everyone together around the arts & music to have an amazing time.

Have you ever played a skating party before? How is this show different than the other sets you have performed in the past?

Photo by Greg Cook

I’ve played a party where people are skating before but nothing near as proper as this! This is different on a lot of levels, as a DJ you are 90% of the time playing in dark clubs at night to a 21-35 year old crowd who probably don’t know a lot of these classic records, or if they do, it’s the same way I do, from going back and discovering rather than experiencing it at the time. The amazing diversity this party brings means you have the people who heard and love these records when they came out and experienced them in a way I never could (being born in ’83). You also have the younger generation getting exposed to these classics at the same time and seeing the effect they have on people! There’s also nothing quite like good disco records in the sunshine!

What kinds of tricks do you guys have up your sleeves for Friday’s event?
To me this is all about the music – my only trick will be quality records taking the spotlight!

We live in a time where DJ’s are put on stages with explosions and light shows as a distraction from the fact that the music is lacking.

I view my role here as a guide to create a seamless flow of great music and vibes. I also take it as a personal mission to show people that disco music goes so much deeper than Saturday Night Fever!

What has Donna Summer’s music meant for you in your careers? What did Donna Summer mean for Boston music in general?
Like I mentioned before, being born in the 80s I missed out on the original explosion but have done everything I can to catch up.

To me disco music is one of the most universal forms of music and encompasses so much – it’s dance music, it can be as musically complex as jazz, it can be soulful, it can be political, it can also just be fun.

As for Donna specifically the thing I admire about her most is her willingness to push the envelope. It’s easy to play it safe when you are at the top but she chose to work with Giorgio Moroder and helped bring electronic music into the mainstream in doing so.

How is an event like this, an all ages one that appeals to such a wide range of listeners, important for a local music scene? What is the importance of community as it pertains to music?

Photo by Greg Cook

This type of thing is, I think, the number one way Boston can become the “world class” city it wants to be. It’s not about getting the olympics or getting google to build offices, it’s about events like this that bring everyone together around the arts & music to have an amazing time. Boston is segregated in a lot of ways and ignoring those barriers and bringing communities together who might not usually interact is really important.

What are you most excited about for Friday (June 19th, 2015)? Anything else in particular that you’d like to add?
I’m most excited to see a massive & diverse crowd celebrating and dancing to amazing music in the heart of Boston. If I’m being completely honest it’s not something I thought I’d ever see here! Come early! It’s only 4 hours and once a year so come enjoy as much as you can!

Bosq is also an accomplished musician and producer. Follow him online here.

Caserta had the pleasure of DJ’ing the event with DJ Kon last year. Caserta is a consummate Bostonian, and Kon’s right hand man. Imagine this interview in a thich Bawston accent.

 Seeing the younger generation take a break from the same cookie cutter music they hear on the radio and in the local dance clubs to do something different is probably the most gratifying part for me.

Have you ever played a skating party before? How is this show different than the other sets you have performed in the past?
I actually played last year with Kon, so going into year 2 I have a better idea of what to expect. Truthfull, I never gave to much thought to it being a “Skating Party” as opposed to any other type of event.
Its been said “Music is the universal language.” While it sounds cliche it still holds true, It doesn’t matter if your on skates, in sneakers or off in one of the 4 corners of the world. Good music will always get a party going.

Caserta in Action – Photo by Lizz Ellis

What kinds of tricks do you guys have up your sleeves for Friday’s event?

Well, I was planning on DJing in bellbottoms and roller-skates but the City was worried I may roll off the back of the stage and split my pants so I guess that’s out. In all seriousness, I’m mainly focused on letting the music do most of the talking. However, if you pay close attention to and your a true disco fanatic you may notice some surprises in there (wink wink).

What has Donna Summer’s music meant for you in your careers? What did Donna Summer mean for Boston music in general?
Unfortunately I wasn’t born when Donna was at her peak so I didn’t get to witness it first hand. However being born and raised around Boston in a very musical home, I’d say I picked up on things rather quickly. Looking back on the 70’s-80’s wether it was Donna Summer, Tavares or New Edition to name a few, the city certainly wasn’t short on talent.

How is an event like this, an all ages one that appeals to such a wide range of listeners, important for a local music scene? What is the importance of community as it pertains to music?
I think its very important, and not just to the music scene but people in general. For me it’s as simple as people of all ages and walks of life coming together just to have a good time.
It was especially exciting for me last year to see the amount of young people that came out and enjoyed themselves. Seeing the younger generation take a break from the same cookie cutter music they hear on the radio and in the local dance clubs to do something different is probably the most gratifying part for me.

What are you most excited about for Friday? Anything else in particular that you’d like to add?
To be honest I’m excited for it all, It’s hard for me to pick one thing out of an event so unique and important to the city .

But if pressed to pick, I’d be remiss if I didn’t mention how much I loved seeing people with their own custom skates and outfits last year. It brought an authenticity to the event for me to know these people were actually there when Disco was topping the charts and Donna Summer was its Queen.

Lastly I’d like to say, Get there early! Events like this is hard to come by these days so Id suggest taking as much in as possible!

Caserta is also more than a DJ. Check the free download below.

The night of fun turned out to be a success with hundreds of people dancing and a line of eager roller-skaters that went all around City Hall. To see more pictures of the event, click here.

Are you interested in becoming a DJ or producer, or both? Take a tour of our school and learn how to become oneContact us today and get your music career rolling.

The 10 Best Warehouse Techno Tracks, According to Scuba

Best_Warehouse_Techno_Tracks_Scuba_2015_Photo_By_Danny_North__750_500_75_sScuba lists some of the best warehouse-ready techno tracks that form the DNA of his new album ‘Claustrophobia’.

1. Jeff Mills – The Bells 

“A classic in the proper sense of the word, and one that defines the techno genre as much as any other track. No one bridged the gap between the European and American approaches to techno quite like Jeff Mills, and while there are many other productions of his which you could put in a list like this, none of them sound quite like The Bells.”

2. Porter Ricks – Port Of Call 

“If Mills defined the links between Europe and America, Chain Reaction epitomised ’90s Berlin. Totally different to what was coming out of the UK and other European centres like Belgium at the time, the Berlin sound was deep, menancing and atmospheric. The Porter Ricks releases on the label buried grooves underneath layers of static and atonal sonic waves in a way that hinted at relegating the dancefloor to secondary importance, but managing to bring the different aspects together in a way that made the records inescapably club-centric.”

3. Surgeon – Muggerscum Out 

“One of the first records I ever bought as a teenager getting into techno in London. The Birmingham sound was another distinct voice in the mid-’90s, and Surgeon was arguably the key man. His attention to detail reminded me of another producer I got into around then, although working in a completely different style – Photek. I definitely bought this and ‘Photek 5’ around the same time, and I remember being notably blown away by both of them.”

4. Ben Klock – Subzero 

“One of the defining records of the latter Berlin era, the dominance of Berghain in the city over the past few years has been almost total and with good reason. Obviously Ben has been a key part of that and his productions are almost as important as his DJing in that respect. It’s difficult to think of another record that sums up Berghain in quite such a succinct way – it was clearly made with the sole intention of being played on that system.”

@ben_klock feeding #coachella the #undergroundtechno and they're loving it

A video posted by raiz droid vrv (@raizdroid) on

5. Spira – Bruised 

“The sound of mid-’90s London techno. Another of my early record shop purchases, this and all their other material is extremely uncompromising and sounds these days almost impossibly hard-edged. One of the stranger coincidences I’ve had was finding out years later that a former Spira member was currently managing me… unexpected to say the least. Not any more, although we’re still on good terms.”

6. Dave Clarke – Wisdom to the Wise (Red 2) 

“Frequently (and rightly) referred to as one of the most important techno records ever, I went back to this recently and it’s amazing how fresh it still sounds. My way into Dave Clarke’s stuff was Red 3 when it came out, but as soon as I clocked that I went back and bought the first two immediately. There’s also a track of his called Southside which essentially did the exact Daft Punk filter thing, but before they did it. A proper legend.

7. Sister Cyrex – First Question 

“I played Carl Cox’s first ‘F.A.C.T.’ CD literally on repeat for at least a year when I was at school; I was totally obsessed with it. It was in the period where he was playing predominantly pretty hard techno but mixing it with trancey stuff (in the best possible sense), like things off the Platipus label and other early Goa-type tracks. This track manages to blend the two styles pretty perfectly though. It’s definitely a techno record, but it’s got that crazy psychedelic edge to it.”

8. F.U.S.E. – Substance Abuse 

“Hawtin at his best, this is an absolutely seminal acid record which probably has to be played in a warehouse to be appreciated fully. There are so many key records from this period in his catalogue, as F.U.S.E. but also as Plastikman and under his real name.”

9. Recondite – Cleric 

“Probably the recent techno record that’s got the biggest reactions in my DJ sets over the past couple of years. Recondite first gained attention for his (proper) deep house stuff, but when he turned his attention to techno he really took off. This is one of those tracks that’s so simple in conception, but absolutely perfectly executed… Which is a trick all the best records pull off, really.”

10. Kosmic Messenger – Flash 

Stacey Pullen‘s Kosmic Messenger alias was another thing I was pretty obsessed with when I first got into buying vinyl. There were a few key releases, especially the ones on Plink Plonk records, of which this was one. It was also on the classic Laurant Garnier Laboritoire mix which was very influential on me as a DJ early on – it covered quite a wide range of styles and changed tempo frequently, which was an approach to DJing I was really into.”

Scuba is playing at Middlesex Lounge on May 14th during Together Boston! Click here for info on the event.

Together 2015: First Wave Artists

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Take note: Together Boston is coming sooner than you think. Current weather aside we are pleased to say that Together will once again be taking over Boston for a full week this coming May 10-17. So, with early bird passes up and ready for purchase comes the first big announcement of the Together season: its first wave of artists. As such, Together Boston is proud to host the following international artists as part of its programming:

Mano le Tough — Irish-born but Berlin-bred Niall Mannon is an ever-rising star of European club culture. Famously known for his melodic and propulsive music, under the Mano le Tough guise he’s written an LP on top of work with Totally Enormous Extinct Dinosaurs, Tensnake, and Roisin Murphy. [Fri 5.15 at Middle East Downstairs]

Justin Martin — At this point, Dirtybird has become synonymous with modern music, with Claude VonStroke, Worthy, and Christian Martin its ambassadors. Justin Martin is also well known for his jumpy, hook-laden and hip-hop inspired house sound. Expect to have fun. [Sat 5.16, Middle East Downstairs]

Sasha — Long before “EDM” was a buzzword, Sasha was lighting up dancefloors around the globe. Launching his career as part of the iconic duo Sasha and Digweed and evolving to various solo efforts, from trance to house to techno, every single fan of club culture knowns the name Sasha. [Fri 5.15 at Bijou Boston]

ScubaScuba (aka Paul Rose) has gone on a creative journey since splashing onto the music scene with HotFlush records. From dubstep to hook-laden house to his now emotional and dark techno music, Mr. Rose returns to Boston and Make It New. [Thu 5.14 at Middlesex Lounge]

Ardalan — Joining Martin is the latest star from the Dirtybird squad: Ardalan. The Iranian will bring a slew of unreleased edits and collabs in tow. [Sat 5.16, Middle East Downstairs]

Together promises to announce even more insane talent as we get closer to May, so don’t sleep: get your passes now!

Mmmmaven presents: Today

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Those nice summer days are coming to an end. The ominous chill of an oncoming winter is not far off. Could there be a better way to bring Summer to a close than with a free outdoor dance party in South Boston? Not only is this a dance party but there will also be art installations, games and food trucks! Roxy’s Grilled Cheese, Mei Mei, and Frozen Hoagies will be dishing out tasty treats to fuel your expressive dance routines.

Everyone on this lineup is worth checking out, but I am particularly excited about Jacques Greene. He lays down a driving, melodic house sound that I find particularly infectious.

Also, locals John Barera, Leah V, and Bianca Oblivion will no doubt provide the crowd with grooviness in all its wonderful forms. I leave you with a slippery John Barera track, and hope to see you at the Lawn on D, 420 D street in South Boston at 3PM!