Make It New Residents Night [11/10]

makeitstrange

You want free? We got free. Every so often we keep a night open for our local residents (Baltimoroder and Coralcola) to flap their wings and fly. Sometimes playing requests, viagra Ministry? Depeche Mode? … who knows what all.

As an audience, view you deserve it. Coming week after week, this is an opportunity to let your freak flag fly, invite the homies that might not usually come through, and, of course, have a great time.

After letting some astonishing guests control the booth all night, our resident DJs Coralcola and Baltimoroder are back at it. Flexing what they got, Mikey and Erik can drop a wide array from their immense collection of crates.

They know exactly what you want, and they are going to give it to you.

Free before 11pm. See you there.

Make It New Residents Night Thursday November 10th
Middlesex Lounge
315 Massachusetts Ave.
Central Square Cultural District
Cambridge, Massachusetts
Free before 11pm

Want to know more about the DJ Program at MMMMAVEN? Drop us a line below and get a free introductory DJ lesson.

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How to Create Smart Crates in Serato

This tutorial will guide you through the process of creating crates and smart crates in Serato DJ

Being prepared for a gig is crucial to being a successful DJ. Having the proper equipment, the right software (Serato DJ in our case), and a colorful song list will make you look nice and professional, and set the right tone for your night. People will know you mean business and came to set the party off. Something most beginning DJs overlook is creating a crate before a gig. A crate is a digital box to organize your music in Serato, essentially like Serato playlists. Using a crate allows you to plan ahead to cater to the type of party you are DJing. The point of having a crate is so you do not end up frantically foraging through your massive music library trying to find similar songs that fit your party’s tone during the party. That just looks bad and people can inevitably tell when you end up rushing transitions. Planning ahead goes a long way!

be_prepared

So, how do you set up a crate in Serato? Very easily!

Normal Crates

1. Click the ‘Add Crate’ button.

add_crate

2. Right click the crate to rename it.

Give it a good name that encompasses the type of music you want in the crate. It can be as convoluted as “HIP-HOP, BPM 100-130, KEYS 1-5,” or as simple as “HIP-HOP”

3. Click the ‘File’ button to add music

To go through your music library in Serato, click the File button located on the top right of the song section. Now search for the songs you want in the crate, and click and drag.
serato_files_icon

4. Locate your music

Usually found along this path:
serato_file_path

5. Add music to crate

Now, click and drag songs to update your crates! Look at this example to see how to efficiently organize your crates:
serato_crates_organized

Smart Crates

To take your crate game to the next level, try using Smart Crates. Smart Crates are created with a set of rules that automatically updates and curates the crate so you don’t have to keep adding new songs as you get them.

1. Click the ‘Add Smart Crate’ button next to the ‘Add Crate’ button.

smart_crate_button

2. Click the ‘Add Rule’ button to add rules.

Rules are what separate smart crates from crates. With rules, Serato will automatically know what songs to add to the smart crate and do it for you.
smart_crate_add_rule

You will find that there are all types of rules you can set, from “song added before 12/31/2012,” to “bpm equal to 128,” to “artist contains Major Lazer,” etc. Pay attention to the ‘Match All of the Following Rules’ checkbox; check it if you want songs that follow all the rules for the crate, leave it unchecked if you want all the songs that follow all the rules.
Seato_crate_rule_examples

3. Finish Smart Crate

Once you finish making all your rules, hit ‘OK’ and watch Serato do its magic! Look over your new smart crate and make sure your rules encompasses all the songs you want to include. Additionally, you can manually add songs to your smart crate if they do not follow the crate’s rules.

Now that you created your crates and smart crates in Serato, it is time to put them to the test and be one step ahead of the game for the next gig you play!

If you want to learn more about live DJing with Serato, hit us up for more information on our DJ classes.

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Graduation Party Tonight!

flowtrigger
On Monday, pharm September 12th, order Mmmmaven will graduate yet another class of artists to join ranks with Boston’s finest DJs. For two months, these students have been giving it all they’ve got. They’ve learned the tricks of the mix, now all they need is an audience.

We welcome 3 new DJs + 3 alumni special guests to Good Life Boston. Come show your support and they’ll show you a good time!

Set times:

7-730: Rick
730-8: Rahul
8-830: Jaime
830-9: Flow Trigger

9-930: Ban Gent
930-10: Adrian Cole

IN THE MMMMIX
MMMMAVEN PROJECT GRADUATION PARTY
Monday. 9.12.2016
Good Life Boston

Want to learn more about the DJ Program at MMMMAVEN? Drop us a line below and get a free introductory DJ lesson.

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Intro to Digital Signal Processing and Synthesis Using Max for Live Workshop – FREE WORKSHOP [9/9]

Want to learn about digital signal processing and synthesis?

synthesis

Stop by our laboratory on September 9th for our workshop on Digital Signal Processing and Synthesis with DJ and audio engineer Ed Guild! The workshop will focus on Ableton and Cycling ‘74’s collaboration, viagra buy Max for Live, unhealthy which is a great way to start learning about digital signal processing and synthesis techniques.

The workshop will cover such topics as:

– Wavetable synthesis
– Filtering
– Feedback delays
– Distortion

The Instructor – Ed Guild

maxfor liveEd Guild is a designer, audio engineer, and technologist. He got his start in the Boston music scene 15 years ago as a VJ for underground DJ events and local jambands playing the rock club circuit. Ed joined up with a few bands to project visuals during their shows. After VJing for a number of years he started to absorb new roles as an audio tech in the underground dance music band, Psylab.

A friend introduced him to Cycling ‘74 ‘Max’ and everything changed. Max is a visual programming environment used for building audio/visual applications. Having limited programming experience, Max allowed Ed to learn how to build digital signal processing (DSP) he wanted for live performance without writing a single live of code. With Max he was able to build a live performance drum sampler, audio effects for a trumpet player, and audio-reactive DMX light controllers for Psylab’s epic live shows.

RSVP HERE