Mmmmaven Project Comes to an End

learn to beatmatch in our studio

In early ’19, the educational initiative will draw the curtain

It is with great cause for celebration that we announce that the Mmmmaven Project–a plan to educate hundreds of people–will conclude with resounding success.

Early in 2019, the project, which is located at 614 Massachusetts Avenue in Central Square, Cambridge will close its doors for good.

We’ve done an amazing thing! For almost seven years, we have kept this project growing. With tremendous support from the community and our instructors as well as the dedication of our students, we’ve been able to give hundreds of people new digital tools to create and mix music.

Our events aren’t going anywhere. The weekly Make It New celebration and annual Together Festival–as well as the other events we produce year round–will continue.

While the physical space will close with honor early next year, the next iteration of this new music movement will take a new form. Stay tuned for the next chapter. It’s coming!

There were many times we couldn’t believe what we had all accomplished together and couldn’t be happier with the many, many people who contributed. We are sure whatever and whoever comes next will be even more awesome. In the meantime, any and all correspondence regarding this future should be directed to alex@mmmmaven.com.

Watch this space. The celebrations and collaborations will continue in perpetuity, and, of course, thank you for the six years of support.

Onward with power,

The entire Mmmmaven Project family

PS: This next round of group classes may be the final chance for anyone looking to expand their talented tool belt with music technology. Is it you? Someone you know? Reach out to become one of the last Mmmmaven Project graduates ever.

Do androids dream of electric beats? An appendix

How AI is changing music for good

Breakthroughs in artificial intelligence make music composition easier than ever – because a machine is doing half the work. Could computers soon go it alone?



by Tirhakah Love via The Guardian.

In this long read from The Guardian, we’ve picked some of the music they referenced and put them here.

Most recently, producer Baauer – who topped the US charts in 2012 with his viral track Harlem Shake – made Hate Me with Lil Miquela, an artificial digital Instagram avatar.

“The first computer-generated score, a string quartet called the Illiac Suite, was developed in 1957 by Lejaren Hiller (MIT), and was met with massive controversy among the classical community.”

“Fast forward to 1980, and after an insufferable bout of composer’s block, California music professor David Cope began building a computer that could read music from a database written in numerical code.”

“YouTube singing sensation Taryn Southern has constructed an LP composed and produced completely by AI using a reworking of Cope’s methods.”

“Southern uses an open source AI platform called Amper to input preferences such as genre, instrumentation, key and beats per minute. Amper is an artificially intelligent music composer founded by film composers Drew Silverstein, Sam Estes and Michael Hobe.”

Finally, a beatbox battle with a machine:

Mill Move Me | See Sound Voice-Driven Sound Sculptures from The Mill on Vimeo.

Dig into all the references to AI and music at the Guardian. Want to explore your own future of music? That’s why we are here

Experimental and obscure musical instruments from the bygone era


We all know about the Theremin (right?) but have you heard of the Pyrophone? … Ondes Martenot? The Cristal Baschet? What about the American Photoplayer?

via The Vintage News

When it comes to musical instruments and music, there is no limit to people’s creativity and imagination. Literally everything around us can be used as an instrument, as a means to produce sound. Music has been an inseparable part of human existence since the beginning of our evolution.

Throughout history, musicians and instrument makers have been experimenting with different ways of producing sound and melody. Some of the contraptions created have become a standard in the musical world. The others, the ones that are more experimental or obscure, are pushing the borders of sound and inspiring musicians to pursue new horizons.

Take the deep dive into this wacky world here

Resident Advisor Praises Together

It was hard not to marvel at what Together has created in the last nine years.

As Boston’s Together festival closed last month, we were again put into the spotlight by the arbiter of the world dance music community: Resident Advisor.

In the article, Drum and Bass legend Lenore is respectfully named “one of Boston’s most important DJs,” Houseboi is now an “opening-night tradition,” recent SF transplant Aaron Jen is lauded for his “masterclass” of an opening set, and the mighty DJ Kon is (obviously) the “edit master.”

Click here for more on our scene and thank you to Resident Advisor and Andrew Ryce for making a little noise about our part of the global community… We shall return September 22nd-29th!