Do androids dream of electric beats? An appendix

How AI is changing music for good

Breakthroughs in artificial intelligence make music composition easier than ever – because a machine is doing half the work. Could computers soon go it alone?



by Tirhakah Love via The Guardian.

In this long read from The Guardian, we’ve picked some of the music they referenced and put them here.

Most recently, producer Baauer – who topped the US charts in 2012 with his viral track Harlem Shake – made Hate Me with Lil Miquela, an artificial digital Instagram avatar.

“The first computer-generated score, a string quartet called the Illiac Suite, was developed in 1957 by Lejaren Hiller (MIT), and was met with massive controversy among the classical community.”

“Fast forward to 1980, and after an insufferable bout of composer’s block, California music professor David Cope began building a computer that could read music from a database written in numerical code.”

“YouTube singing sensation Taryn Southern has constructed an LP composed and produced completely by AI using a reworking of Cope’s methods.”

“Southern uses an open source AI platform called Amper to input preferences such as genre, instrumentation, key and beats per minute. Amper is an artificially intelligent music composer founded by film composers Drew Silverstein, Sam Estes and Michael Hobe.”

Finally, a beatbox battle with a machine:

Mill Move Me | See Sound Voice-Driven Sound Sculptures from The Mill on Vimeo.

Dig into all the references to AI and music at the Guardian. Want to explore your own future of music? That’s why we are here