Ableton 10 Around the Corner?

Big announcement at LOOP 2017?

Traditionally, Ableton announces big news at its annual event LOOP. This year, LOOP will be happening in Berlin, November 10th-12th, and there are increasing rumors that Ableton 10 will be announced then. While there is nothing substantial on the official Ableton website yet, there have been rumors, certain visuals and overall a huge expectation that 10 is right around the corner.

REVIVE: One of our superstar interns was able to go to Loop last year. Read about her fascinating experience here, here, here, and here.

Two photos leaked on Reddit show that Ableton is selling 9 at a 20% discount rate until 10 comes out. They will offer a free upgrade to people who have Ableton 9, which is wonderful news for anyone that recently bought Ableton 9.

Expectations of a new UI

Some users of Ableton are hoping for improvements in the general user interface of Ableton with the new release. While it is unclear whether or not there will be any drastic changes; there have been expectations toppled with supposedly leaked screenshots taken from blurry photos of artist desktops. Whichever the case might be, there’s definitely an expectation that we will face a new UI with Ableton 10.

Our production classes can show you everything you want to know about Ableton! Hit me up to learn more!

Instrumental Instruments: Atari ST

This RBMA series on important music-making devices continues with the personal computer that was the first major step in the democratization of electronic music production.

“I was a bit shocked when I saw people use the Atari ST for things other than music. I almost forgot that it was a home computer.”

“I’d get a phone call from Jean-Michel Jarre asking technical questions. It was an honour to talk to him, but I didn’t have a clue what I was saying.”

“There were these crazy records coming out, and this was only possible because of the Atari.”

Read much much more at RBMA Daily.

Alummmmni: Richard Nordin

Richard Nordin was an army brat originally from Pittsburgh, who eventually found himself going to school in Worcester, MA. The mundane, seemingly nonexistent, nightlife scene in Worcester motivated him to finish school as quickly as possible, which would allow him to relocate to Boston, where the nightlife scene was thriving, full of life, creativity, and diversity.

He got his start DJing at the underground venue Red Tail in Manchester, NH. After attending Mmmmaven’s Make It New events, it sparked his interest in producing music. He loved the focus on underground music at Make It New, which led him to take music production classes at Mmmmaven. He not only took Production 101 and 102, but he took them twice.

“The producers I studied with were really gifted and intelligent and I could come in looking at any particular genre and the teachers would bend to whatever genre I wanted to learn production skills in.”

Nordin has gone on to play at Burning Man and notes Kink and House of Prayers as a couple of his musical influences. His long term goal is to utilize his knowledge and creativity to create music for the underground music scene. He started Houseboi, an event held the first Wednesday every month, which he also manages. It features performances that include singing, burlesque, drag, and is queer friendly. The characters are colorful, and the show is welcoming to all humans and their friends.

His advice for anyone interested in learning how to DJ or produce: put in the time, take plenty of notes, do your homework, and treat it like a second job.

Our advice? Sign up for our email list!

Subscribe to our mailing list

* indicates required



()
(###) ###-####

Email Format

Gamma Sonification: MIT Students Make Music From Particle Energy

Meanwhile at MIT…

In past classes, students have created soundwalks and graphic scores, learning about experimental pieces that broaden conventional ideas about sound. “We start off doing things that are meant to expand what the students think of as being music and get them listening more deeply,” says Makan. In his most recent class, students were asked to design a musical instrument. Some made flutes, chimes, and homemade drums. Sergheyev, Lopez, and Liu decided to make musical textures from nuclear radiation.

“I’ve always been interested in things that were misunderstood,” says Liu.

Read all about the process at the MIT Shass blog.

We can’t teach you Nuclear Physics, but we can teach you about music! Sign up for our latest news and information:

Subscribe to our mailing list

* indicates required



()
(###) ###-####

Email Format